Archive for August 2003

Low tides next week.

A few months ago there was a rare ultra-low tide in Vancouver and Cory and I spent a day at the beach marvelling at how far the beach extended. Today, riding home from work earlier, i noticed that the tides were out again. They’re not quite as far, but the beach still stretches an impressive distance out into the water. Back in the 1960s (or so) I believe there was a proposal to use landfill to increase the height of this area and create a city airport. Fortunately for one of the prettiest spots in Vancouver, this didn’t come to pass.

I’d highly recommend taking a trip down to the beach at a low tide point. We’re entering a neap tide period so the tidal range will decrease for the next few days, but by thursday the tides should be worth the trip to Spanish Banks and the lowest tides (0.9m) will be at 9am on Saturday the 6th and 10am on Sunday the 7th. The next time the tide will be this low is October 1st at 3:30am, so it’s worth the effort while the weather is still nice.
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Auntie Vera’s Quilt

We’re back from Toronto, and while I was sad to leave, I’m relieved to have the flights over with. I still love Toronto, the old brick arch holding the room up in the bar we went to on Roncesville with Alex on saturday night epitomized the difference in the cities; Vancouver is missing that sense of history Toronto can lay claim to. I looked around the streets and even the trees that cast shade over the sidewalk were twice the age of the city of Vancouver. Yet home is now where we live together, and in Toronto I’m unsure of where things are in the dark. I was not yet an adult when I lived there, and a child’s world can be smaller than the city limits.

The trip was fabulous, I feel better after having had time to spend an time with my Nana and Bompa and Auntie Vera. It’s hard being so far away from them when they’re sick, you feel helpless. It does put a damper on ideas of moving overseas, or even just staying in Vancouver, there’s so much I’m missing because of where we live. Is that worth moving back to Ontario for? Is it okay that I’m not there physically because I talk to them on the phone far more often than if I was?
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off to toronto

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out of town

Trish is out of town for a conference, back on Wednesday.

In the meantime, anyone looking to play darts, playstation, etc. should give Cory a call…
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nana’s freezer

My parent’s power came on at 5am, my brother’s got power, but my grandparents and my great aunt are still in the dark. Last night they were telling us not to phone Ontario to keep the lines clear, but I got a hold of people this morning and everyone’s fine. The biggest concern seems to be the contents of my grandmother’s freezer, which holds seven homemade shepards pies, so as a family, everything’s okay.

(and now back to the entry I’d planned on writing). I’ve a new sewing machine, an older Pfaff that C’s mom didn’t need any more. Compared to my Kenmore, the machine is a dream, it’s so smooth and quiet that I can actually imagine myself getting excited about the machine part of quilting. How lovely!
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the littlest nephew

Here’s another pic of the youngest nephew looking like the little sweetie he is.
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Banff 2003: Forest Fires

We had some excitement on the drive to Panorama, a ski resort 3.5 hours to the west of Calgary where Cory was doing a site visit for a construction project.

Normally the drive to Panorama is superb, the route takes you through Banff and Kootenay National Parks where blue skies and white capped-peaks make for perfect postcards almost every day of the year. We expected this trip to be different, as the haze from forest fires burning throughout the mountains was visible even in Calgary. Even so, we weren?t prepared for how thick the smoke became as we approached the parks and by the time we passed Banff we were enveloped in a smoky fog that hurt our eyes and drowned out any view of the mountains entirely.

Now, we knew that smoke from the forest fires burning all through Alberta and British Columbia was a likely accompaniment to portions of our trip, this year is the worst in decades for fires, with dry conditions and frequent lightning sparking hundreds of blazes on a daily basis. The McClure fire, currently 16,614 hectares in size dominated the news, where 6500 residents had been evacuated from the area north of Kamloops. While we were driving we heard the first indications of the devastation, the community of Lewis Creek destroyed by fire with around 35 homes completely burnt.

A large fire near Crowsnest Pass, just south of the parks had recently run its course and our first thought was that the smoke had drifted north from there. As we travelled further into the park, the smoke became heavier though, and past Cascade Mountain, the skies peeping over the mountain began to take on an orange glow. Further up the road, Castle Mountain was barely visible, with the smoke growing ever denser like an oceanic fog but sharp, biting at the eyes and tasting foul. Just before our junction, we spotted a sign that highway 93S was closed, the road to Panorama. Reaching the turnoff, now with a heavy scent of fire in the air, we spoke with park staff and found out that a fire within Kootenay Park was burning on both sides of the highway producing ash that was falling on Banff town site.

As the Kootenay fire did not endanger communities, and fires being needed natural events, the fire had not been as newsworthy as the many other fires displacing residents so we hadn?t even heard mention of it until reaching the park. We detoured up through Golden (see map) battling camper vans and increased traffic, finally reaching Panorama six hours after setting out from Calgary on the 3.5 hour drive. West winds blew the smoke east, so the skies here were clear, no evidence of the fires visible from our hotel room window where we watched children play in the resort pool and marvelled at the difference a mountain range could make.


Back from Holiday …

We spent two days in Regina, visiting immediate family, one night in Calgary visiting old friends, one night in Panorama where Cory was working, and one night in Cranbrook with Cory’s Aunt and Uncle. A busy trip not nearly long enough, but still wonderful. We hadn’t seen this charismatic fellow for 18 months, and he’s now much more of a person that his 6month old self. Kale was slightly wary of these new people walking in to his life, but he grew friendlier as the weekend wore on.


We had some excitement on the drive to Panorama, a ski resort 3.5 hours to the west of Calgary where Cory was doing a site visit for a construction project.

Normally the drive to Panorama is superb, the route takes you through Banff and Kootenay National Parks where blue skies and white capped-peaks make for perfect postcards almost every day of the year. We expected this trip to be different though, as the haze from forest fires burning throughout the mountains was visible even in Calgary. We weren?t prepared however for how thick the smoke became as we approached the parks and by the time we passed Banff we were enveloped in a smoky fog that hurt our eyes and drowned out any view of the mountains entirely.

continue reading Forest Fires in Banff …
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a face in the crowd

You know when you’re at an event and you see someone you know so you start waving your arms to get their attention and they still don’t see you? You know when, after making a fool of yourself, you give up? You know when you finally see that person again and you tell them about it they’re suprised that they didn’t notice? After all, they’re not *that* self absorbed… I am that person, and there’s no excuse for me not seeing you (follow the little white arrow). I guess I am that self absorbed, sorry!
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