no longer newlyweds

We spent the weekend at a B&B on Bowen Island to celebrate our anniversary (a lovely gift from my parents). Since it mainly involved sitting in a hot tub overlooking the bay and drinking wine, it was just perfect and I feel very relaxed this morning!

We dashed in and out of shops on Saturday, avoiding the worst of the rain by carefully timing our coffee breaks. Bowen’s not really a shopping destination, for all that they advertise themselves as the home of over 400 artists. The afternoon was relaxing though and helped drain the stress of work away.

Yesterday we did a shortish walk around Killarney Lake in the center of the island. The rain had stopped (it’s raining here again) and it was a quiet and peaceful place to spend a few hours.

We then visited a friend of Cory’s who lives on the island with his wife and kids and spent a few hours in their world, an almost rural experience within commuting distance to the city. The ferry from Bowen island connects to an express bus for a total commute time of one hour each way. While that’s more than Cory’s 35 minute walk, it’s actually less than driving in from the suburbs (parts of Coquitlam, Langley, and Surrey). Bowen is a fabulous place, perhaps a bit lacking in facilities (no public pool!), but still an affordable way to purchase a house and work in Vancouver. Not that we have any intention of buying a house, we’re very happy living close to restaurants and transportation routes and avoiding wasting any time on home maintenance. (I harbour a growing dislike of shows like “trading spaces”. I’ve far better things to do with my time).

After getting home last night we walked around the city for over an hour, up Broadway to Main and down Main to 30th. There’s some very funky shops around there, independent coffee houses and bars. We peered in windows and strolled holding hands and I felt like i could walk for hours. By the time we got home I was tired though, and looking around my own neighbourhood I realized that everything we need is right here. Sure there’s only one funky bar (Cafe Barney) and a few good coffee places (Bean around the world, Cafe Crepe), but everything we need and like (Meinhardts, Granville Island) is within walking distance on streets that seem quite safe in the evenings.

I like where we live. Sure, someday I’d like to live in a smaller centre where housing is affordable and people are more friendly, and the pub has a beer glass for me behind the bar. Right now though, this is perfect. We have a comfy apartment full of art and photos and everything we own can be easily moved (or thrown out) anywhere in the world if we want to pick up and go.

boardwalk.JPG

11 Bitter Lemons

  1. Jeorg says:

    I can only say one thing about Ever/loves/ray… We watch it, and Thomas can attest to the fact that I’d be much happier if Deborah were no longer on the show. I cannot stand to watch people “test” their relationships. Grrrr….

  2. treefen says:

    I have to admit to a Trading Spaces fetish – I would love to be able to paint my home cheerful colours and do other things that would make it feel more like a home than just a place we live. But I think it is more because of the cheapness factor than anything else. They often have great ideas on how to improve things for next to nothing – I only like watching the good designers though. I hate it when they do a theme room or some other unliveable crap. Vern is the best – he does tasteful rooms with relaxing colour schemes. And he’s cute.

    Cut me some slack, OK? This is just about the only TV I watch anymore, and only when I’m at a friend’s house that has cable. It could be worse… I could be watching Everybody Loves Raymond.

  3. gimmy says:

    That’s exactly how I feel about where we live too. And yes, one day I’d like to move as well. 8)

  4. trish says:

    maybe I’m just too much like a guy… I’ve spent so much of my time in the company of men in the past few years that I can’t appreciate “female” past-times. Or maybe it’s just that all the stuff on Trading Spaces always looks like absolute crap to me. (I saw them paint carpet once. They PAINTED CARPET. If anyone did that to my house I’d probably throw up).

    As for trading blogs, I think there’s been blog trades where there’s been guest posters but I’m not aware of any large scale redesign trades. I think I’d skip out of that one too… Along with blink tags (remind me never to participate in a blog redesign trade with Jason) think of the colour schemes one could devise…

  5. Jason says:

    I don’t get trading spaces. I really don’t. Even if someone made my house look crappy, I probably would be indifferent to it, just as long as there are shelves for my books.

    Maybe I’d be able to relate more if there was something like trading blogs and someone would redesign it for me. I would probably freak out, because I’d likely return to a blog filled with blink tags. hehe.

  6. Mom says:

    Glad you enjoyed your weekend break. Dad and I had a great holiday. Love Mom

  7. Carrie says:

    Changing Rooms is very popular over here and has also made its way to Australia, too. I think people like the idea of a free decorating job and also like it when the people get a really awful room. Some of the stuff they do over here on Changing Rooms is really good (I like Lawerence Llwellyn Bowen, who hosts the show now and was a designer on it for a long time, he does a lot of of design shows; he knows his stuff). You can get ideas for your own place and I think it’s an escapist show. Having said that, the few US Trading Spaces shows I’ve seen when the show it here are a bit different from the UK version – the designers are a bit more over the top wacky in the states rather than trying to make something that people can live with. I mean, grass walls?

    Just an FYI.

    PS Pumpkin Ale, yummmmm

  8. Jeorg says:

    I have a theory about it. It has everything to do with American identity. Americans (read US citizens) are nesting and becoming the isolationists we once were before the Big War. It all stems from 9/11 and the fear of the outside world. I bet if someone did a survey, you’d find USers are travelling abroad less than before. Even a cooking show we watch, she mentioned how she missed the days when people would come on over and just drop by for dinner. Those were the days we stayed home. And it is coming back in full force.

  9. trish says:

    I swear the world is coming to an end. More seriously though, I don’t really understand this intense nesting behaviour that’s popular right now. I went through an “establish my identity” phase when I first moved out and I bought little things for my res room and stuff. But the amount of time and effort people are putting into watching/reading about how OTHER PEOPLE are home decorating is far beyond that.

    Sure, spend time on your own house, and I’ll drop by and tell you it looks awesome. That I totally understand. But getting addicted to TV shows that are all about kooky ideas that don’t represent the people themselves, I don’t get the appeal.

  10. Shirley says:

    Nearly every girl on campus here is in love with Trading Spaces. Two floors in one of the residence buildings even did their own Trading Spaces and decorated each others’ bathrooms/lounge.

  11. Jeorg says:

    It relaxed me just to think about being in a hot tub drinking wine.

  12. treefen says:

    I have to admit to a Trading Spaces fetish – I would love to be able to paint my home cheerful colours and do other things that would make it feel more like a home than just a place we live. But I think it is more because of the cheapness factor than anything else. They often have great ideas on how to improve things for next to nothing – I only like watching the good designers though. I hate it when they do a theme room or some other unliveable crap. Vern is the best – he does tasteful rooms with relaxing colour schemes. And he’s cute.

    Cut me some slack, OK? This is just about the only TV I watch anymore, and only when I’m at a friend’s house that has cable. It could be worse… I could be watching Everybody Loves Raymond.

  13. gimmy says:

    That’s exactly how I feel about where we live too. And yes, one day I’d like to move as well. 8)

  14. trish says:

    maybe I’m just too much like a guy… I’ve spent so much of my time in the company of men in the past few years that I can’t appreciate “female” past-times. Or maybe it’s just that all the stuff on Trading Spaces always looks like absolute crap to me. (I saw them paint carpet once. They PAINTED CARPET. If anyone did that to my house I’d probably throw up).

    As for trading blogs, I think there’s been blog trades where there’s been guest posters but I’m not aware of any large scale redesign trades. I think I’d skip out of that one too… Along with blink tags (remind me never to participate in a blog redesign trade with Jason) think of the colour schemes one could devise…

  15. Jason says:

    I don’t get trading spaces. I really don’t. Even if someone made my house look crappy, I probably would be indifferent to it, just as long as there are shelves for my books.

    Maybe I’d be able to relate more if there was something like trading blogs and someone would redesign it for me. I would probably freak out, because I’d likely return to a blog filled with blink tags. hehe.

  16. Mom says:

    Glad you enjoyed your weekend break. Dad and I had a great holiday. Love Mom

  17. Carrie says:

    Changing Rooms is very popular over here and has also made its way to Australia, too. I think people like the idea of a free decorating job and also like it when the people get a really awful room. Some of the stuff they do over here on Changing Rooms is really good (I like Lawerence Llwellyn Bowen, who hosts the show now and was a designer on it for a long time, he does a lot of of design shows; he knows his stuff). You can get ideas for your own place and I think it’s an escapist show. Having said that, the few US Trading Spaces shows I’ve seen when the show it here are a bit different from the UK version – the designers are a bit more over the top wacky in the states rather than trying to make something that people can live with. I mean, grass walls?

    Just an FYI.

    PS Pumpkin Ale, yummmmm

  18. Jeorg says:

    I have a theory about it. It has everything to do with American identity. Americans (read US citizens) are nesting and becoming the isolationists we once were before the Big War. It all stems from 9/11 and the fear of the outside world. I bet if someone did a survey, you’d find USers are travelling abroad less than before. Even a cooking show we watch, she mentioned how she missed the days when people would come on over and just drop by for dinner. Those were the days we stayed home. And it is coming back in full force.

  19. trish says:

    I swear the world is coming to an end. More seriously though, I don’t really understand this intense nesting behaviour that’s popular right now. I went through an “establish my identity” phase when I first moved out and I bought little things for my res room and stuff. But the amount of time and effort people are putting into watching/reading about how OTHER PEOPLE are home decorating is far beyond that.

    Sure, spend time on your own house, and I’ll drop by and tell you it looks awesome. That I totally understand. But getting addicted to TV shows that are all about kooky ideas that don’t represent the people themselves, I don’t get the appeal.

  20. Shirley says:

    Nearly every girl on campus here is in love with Trading Spaces. Two floors in one of the residence buildings even did their own Trading Spaces and decorated each others’ bathrooms/lounge.

  21. Jeorg says:

    It relaxed me just to think about being in a hot tub drinking wine.

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